Types of Preventive Clothing and Their Uses or Applications Part-7

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Flight Suit:
A flight suit is a full body garment, worn while flying aircraft such as military airplanes, gliders and helicopters. These suits are generally made to keep the wearer warm, as well as being practical (plenty of pockets), and durable (including fire retardant). Its appearance is usually similar to a jumpsuit. A military flight suit may also show rank insignia. It is sometimes used as a combat uniform in Close Quarters Battle or Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure situations, for its practicality.
Figure 51: “Flight suit worn by a Thunderbird passenger”
G-Suit (Anti-g-Suit):
A g-suit, or the more accurately named anti-g suit, is a flight suit worn by aviators and astronauts who are subject to high levels of acceleration force (g). It is designed to prevent a black-out and g-LOC (g-induced loss of consciousness) caused by the blood pooling in the lower part of the body when under acceleration, thus depriving the brain of blood. Black-out and g-LOC has caused a number of fatal aircraft accidents.
Figure 52: “PAF female pilot wearing g-suit”
Figure 53: “MSF830 Anti-g Suit trousers and cummerbund fitted over a flying suit”
Jumpsuit:
Jumpsuit originally referred to the utilitarian one-piece garments used by parachuters/skydivers, but has come to be used as a common term for any one-piece garment with sleeves and legs.

The original skydivers' jumpsuits were simple garments designed to insulate the body from the cold of high altitudes and minimize risk of covering important handles and grips. Today, however, the garment has found other use:

Pilots and Drivers:
Aviators and astronauts, who sometimes wear insulated, fire-retardant jumpsuits or flight suits where other types of clothing can potentially float or flap about in zero gravity or during high-G maneuvers, drivers in motor racing, who wear jumpsuits for protection against fire and (in the case of motorcycle racers) leather suits for abrasion

Sportspersons:
Skiers, who wear insulated jumpsuits or ski suits to protect themselves from cold (especially after falling or tumbling in snow). Competitive skiers and speed skaters, who wear skin-tight jumpsuits to provide freedom of movement while minimising air resistance. Skydivers, who wear technical jumpsuits as main sport equipment for today's sport skydiving.

Manual Laborers:
The jumpsuit's simple one-piece design also makes it a practical garment for tradesmen, such as cleaners, auto mechanics and plumbers, who often wear looser-fitting jumpsuits, or coveralls, where they need a better-protecting garment than an apron or bib.

Institutions:
The jumpsuit has sometimes been mandated as an institutional uniform, as it can be a unisex garment and can accommodate a wide range of body shapes.
  1. University and polytechnic students in Finland and Sweden often wear jumpsuits colored according to their school or field of study at student parties, see student overall.
  2. In Norway, high school students wear jumpsuits for three weeks of May as a part of the graduation ritual Russefeiring
  3. Prisons in the United States and Canada frequently use bright orange jumpsuit uniforms for inmates for ease of identification and high visibility.
Small Children:
A simple-to-launder one-piece garment can be especially convenient for parents to dress small children in. In countries with colder climates, snowsuits, or jumpsuits quilted or padded for warmth, are popular during the wintertime.

Fashion:
Jumpsuits have also reappeared from time to time in high fashion, where it is often attractive to designers because it has an unbroken line running from the neck to the feet and can be flattering on somebody shapes. In the UK, the word onesie has come to describe casual jumpsuits (to be used as loungewear or pyjamas). Jumpsuits are generally regarded as a garment of convenience, as they are simpler to launder, put on and remove than an ensemble outfit. Unless the jumpsuit has a drop seat, however, it is necessary to remove it entirely for bathroom use.
Figure 54: “A man wearing a jumpsuit”
Figure 55: “Formula One driver Kimi Räikkönen in a protective one-piece auto race suit”

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