High Speed/Beam/Direct Warping | Sectional Warping | Differences Between Sectional and High Speed Warping

High Speed Warping:
High speed warping also called Beam warping/Direct warping. In high speed warping the yarn is wound parallel on the warping beam. All the yarns are wound at once and simple flanged beam is used. It is a very high speed process and is used for making fabric of single colour.

Flow Chart of High Speed Warping

Creel

Beam for sizing

Weaver’s Beam

Features of High Speed Warping
  1. It is used to make common fabrics in large quantities
  2. It is used to produce weavers beam from single yarn
  3. The production is high
  4. Large amount of yarn is required to produce a weavers beam
  5. Sizing is done
  6. Simple flanged beam is used and drums are not required 
Sectional Warping
In sectional warping equal length of yarn is first wound in small sections or sheets on a drum. Then from the drum it is transferred to the beam. By this process we directly get the weavers beam. This is a two stage method and is used for making fancy fabrics.
 
Flow Chart of Sectional Warping:
 
Creel

Drum

Beam (Weaver’s Beam)

 Working Principle of Sectional Warping:
  1. Sectional warping is used for short runs especially for fancy pattern fabrics.
  2. In this case sections of the warp which may contain up to 1000 ends are first wound onto a drum tapered with a given cone angle.
  3. So cross wound sections are combined on the drum & thus each layer of warp contains the same number of ends on the drum.
  4. Then the warp threads altogether are transferred onto a weavers beam by unwinding the drum.
  5. In this method the warp threads are not necessarily processed in sizing.
Features of Sectional Warping
  1. This is suitable for making checked, stripped or other fancy fabric.
  2. We directly obtain weaver’s beam from this process
  3. As sizing is not done, so multi-ply yarns or yarns which do not require sizing are used
  4. Small amount of yarn is required to produce the weaver’s beam
  5. Sectional warping is used to produce a warp beam with a greater member if ends
  6. The production is less in sectional warping
  7. The yarn tension is less uniform
  8. It is less efficient than high speed warping
Differences Between Sectional and High Speed Warping

High Speed Warping
Sectional Warping
1. Beam warping is used for long runs of grey fabrics & simple pattern.
1. Sectional warping is used for short runs especially for fancy pattern fabrics.
2. The amount of colored yarn is less than 15% of the total.
2. Greater amount of colored yarn is used.
3. High production.
3. Low production.
4. Large amount of yarn required.
4. Small amount of yarn required.
5. Single yarn is used.
5. Twisted yarn is used.
6. Less expensive.
6. More expensive.
7. It is most widely used for cotton, linen, woolen & worsted yarn.
7. It is most widely used for silk & synthetic yarn.
8. Uniform tension of yarn.
8. Less uniform tension of yarn.
9. Weavers beam is produced after sizing.
9. Weavers beam is produced after warping.
10. Creel capacity is more.
10. Creel capacity is less.
11. Beam warping is more widely used.
11. Sectional warping is not widely used.



1 comments:

Ashfaque Ahmed said...

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