Textile Dictionary-W

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 

Wale

A column of loops along the length of a knitted fabric.

Warp

Yarns which run along the length of a fabric

Water Repellency

The ability of a fabric to shed water to a limited degree.

Water Resistance

A measurement which determines the ability of a fabric to withstand sustained contact with water.

Waterproof

The ability of a fabric to prevent water penetration

Weaving

The process of producing fabric by interlacing warp and weft yarns.

Web

A sheet of fibres produced by a carding machine (carded web) or combing machine (combed web)

Weft

Yarns which run across the width of a fabric (also known as filling).

Wet Spinning

In the wet spinning process, the polymer solution (also known as "dope") is spun into a spin bath containing a liquid chosen for its ability to extract the solvent from the dope.

Whipcord

A firmly constructed fabric with a bold, warp twill.

Wickability

the ability of a fabric to transfer liquids, usually perspiration, along its fibres and away from the wearer's skin by capillary action.

Windproof

The ability of a fabric or membrane to block the passage of external air through it. In cold climatic conditions, windproof garments help to keep the wearer warm.

Worsted

A term used to describe yarns which are spun wholly from combed wool in which the fibres are reasonably parallel, and to describe fabrics or garments made from such yarns.

Waistband (Two-piece)

When two identical pieces of fabric are placed back-to-back at the top of a pant, raw edges turned inside, and joined with two widely spaced rows of stitching. the pant body is inserted betweeen and along one edge.

Wales

In a knitted fabric, the series of loops that are formed by a single needle, which runs vertically or lengthwise in a knitted fabric.

Warmth to Weight Ratio

A measurement used to evaluate the effectiveness of an insulated product in relation to weather conditions and the environment. The insulation with the best rating is down. Down provides the best warmth to weight ratio over almost any other insulation material, which is why you will see down garments and sleeping bags as the primary choice for use in almost every high altitude, cold weather expedition.

Warp

In woven fabric, the yarns that run lengthwise and is interwoven with the fill (weft) yarns.

Warp Knit

A type of knitted fabric construction in which the yarns are formed into stitches in a lengthwise manner. Warp knits are generally less elastic than weft knits. Common examples of warp knits are tricot knits and raschel knits.

Washable

Materials that will not fade or shrink during washing or laundering. Labels should be read by the consumer to assure proper results. Do not confuse with "wash-and-wear".

Wash-and-Wear

Ability of a garment to be washed by hand or in a washing machine and require little or no ironing. Also referred to as "easy care".

Watch Pocket

A small pocket in the garment, typically located just below the front waistband of men's trousers and used to accomodate change or a pocket watch.

Water Repellent

Fabrics that have been treated with a finish which cause them to shed water and resist water penetration, but are still air-permeable. Treatments can include wax coatings, resins, silicones, and fluorine derivatives. Such treatments do not close the pours of the fabric, while waterproof finishes do.

Water Repellent

A term applied to fabrics that have been treated with a finish which causes them to shed water, but are still air-permeable.Water Resistant
A degree by which water is able to penetrate a fabric. Not to be confused with water-repellent. However, the terms are often used interchangeably.

Waterproof

Materials that are impermeable by water.

Waterproof

A term applied to fabrics whose pores have been closed, and therefore, will not allow water or air to pass through them.

Weaving

The process of forming a fabric on a loom by interlacing the warp (lengthwise yarns) and the filling (crosswise yarns) perpendicular to each other. Filling is fed into the goods from cones, filling bobbins or quills, which carry the filling yarns through the shed of the loom. Filling may also be inserted into the material without the use of a shuttle, as in the case of a shuttleless loom. The three basic weaves are Plain, Twill, and Satin. All other weaves, no matter how intricate, employ one or more of these basic weaves in their composition. Variations on the basic weaves make a variety of different fabric surfaces and fabric strengths.

Weft

In woven fabric, the filling yarns that run perpendicular to the warp yarns.

Weft Knit

A type of knitted fabric in which yarns are formed into stitches in widthwise manner. Common examples of weft knits are circular knits and flat knits.

Weight of Cloth

This term describes the variety of ways that fabric is sold: Ounces per linear yard, Yards per pound, and Ounces per square yard. Welded Shell - The outer layer of a bonded wor welded garment, such as a jacket.

Welding

There are two basic methods for applying bonding or welded seams. The first method uses an adhesive film, and the application of heat to glue or laminate two substrates together. The second method involves gluing or attaching two fabrics, using ultrasonic technology. The creation and channeling of high frequency vibratory waves cause a rapid buildup of heat in synthetic fabrics to create the bonding.

Welt

1. A strip of material seamed to a pocket opening as a finishing, as well as a strengthening device. 2. A raised or swelled lap or seam. 3. A covered cord or ornamental strip sewed on a border or along a seam. 4. In knitting, it is flat-knitted separately and then joined to the fabric by looping or hand knitting, as the heel to the stocking. 5. A ribbed piece of knit goods used in forming the end of a sleeve or sock to prevent rolling or raveling.

Welt Lining

Interlining for pocket welts.

Whipcord

A woven fabric with a very steep and compacted twill appearance on the face of the goods. End-uses for the fabric include dress woolens, worsteds, or wool blends, and many types of uniforms.

White Goods

A very broad term which implies any goods bleached and finished in the white condition. Some of the cotton white goods are muslin, cambric, dimity, lawn, longcloth, organdy, voile, etc.

White-on-White

Some fabrics, such as men's shirtings or broadcloth, poplin, madras, etc., are made on a dobby or jacquard loom so the white motifs will appear on a white background.

Wickability

The ability of a fiber or a fabric to disperse moisture and allow it to pass through to the surface of the fabric, so that evaporation can take place.

Wicking

Dispersing or spreading of moisture or liquid through a given area by capillary action in a material.

Wigwan

A converted cotton cloth, dyed black, brown or gray, and given a firm starched, plain calender finish, and used for interlinings in men's and boys's clothing to give body to the garment.

Wind Resistant

The ability of a fabric to act against or oppose the penetration of wind or air, but it is not totally windproof.

Windproof

The ability of a fabric to be nonpermeable to wind and air.

Woof

Comes from the Anglo-Saxon "owef". It is another name for the warp or warp yarn. Sometimes in advertising textiles, the word has been used to imply filling yarn, and made to interchange with the other term, weft.

Wool

Usually associated with fiber or fabric made from the fleece of sheep or lamb. However, the term "wool" can also apply to all animal hair fibers, including the hair of the Cashmere or Angora goat or the specialty hair fibers of the camel, alpaca, llama, or vicuna.

Worsted Fabric

A tightly woven fabric made by using only long staple, combed wool or wool-blend yarns. The fabric has a hard, smooth surface. Gabardine is an example of a worsted fabric. A common end use is men's tailored suits.

Worsted System

The textile process of manufacturing spun yarns from staple fibers usually over 3 inches in length. The main operations are carding, combing, drafting, and spinning.

Woven Fabric

Fabrics composed of two sets of yarns. One set of yarns, the warp, runs along the length of the fabric. The other set of yarns, the fill or weft, is perpendicular to the warp. Woven fabrics are held together by weaving the warp and the fill yarns over and under each other.

Wrinkle Free

A resistant to wrinkling created through the use of a variety of finishes and treatments. Wrinkle Recovery - Similar to resiliency. It is the ability of a fabric to bounce back after it has been twisted, wrinkled, or distorted in any way.

Warp

Yarns place on a warp beam and entered into a loom.

Weft

Often referred to as "filling", it is the yarn that traverses the warp yarns (horizontally) during the weaving operation.

Welt

A piping covered with fabric. Eastern Accents offers three sizes of piping; small .25", medium .5" and large (jumbo) 1.5". The finished welt size depends on the fabric used. Welts are sawn into the seam of a product.

Wool

Fibers that grow on the sheep fleece. There are varieties of wool such as Alpaca, Angora, Botany, Cashmere, Merino and Shetland.

Waistband (one-piece)

A single thickness of fabric that is doubled and stitched to the top of a pant.

Waistband (Two-piece)

When two identical pieces of fabric are placed back-to-back at the top of a pant, raw edges turned inside, and joined with two widely spaced rows of stitching. the pant body is inserted betweeen and along one edge.

Warmth to Weight Ratio

A measurement used to evaluate the effectiveness of an insulated product in relation to weather conditions and the environment. The insulation with the best rating is down. Down provides the best warmth to weight ratio over almost any other insulation material, which is why you will see down garments and sleeping bags as the primary choice for use in almost every high altitude, cold weather expedition.

Warp

In woven fabric, the yarns that run lengthwise and is interwoven with the fill (weft) yarns.

Warp Knit

A type of knitted fabric construction in which the yarns are formed into stitches in a lengthwise manner. Warp knits are generally less elastic than weft knits. Common examples of warp knits are tricot knits and raschel knits.

Washable

Materials that will not fade or shrink during washing or laundering. Labels should be read by the consumer to assure proper results. Do not confuse with "wash-and-wear".

Wash-and-Wear

Ability of a garment to be washed by hand or in a washing machine and require little or no ironing. Also referred to as "easy care".

Watch Pocket

A small pocket in the garment, typically located just below the front waistband of men's trousers and used to accomodate change or a pocket watch.

Water Repellent

Fabrics that have been treated with a finish which cause them to shed water and resist water penetration, but are still air-permeable. Treatments can include wax coatings, resins, silicones, and fluorine derivatives. Such treatments do not close the pours of the fabric, while waterproof finishes do.

Water Repellent

A term applied to fabrics that have been treated with a finish which causes them to shed water, but are still air-permeable.

Water Resistant

A degree by which water is able to penetrate a fabric. Not to be confused with water-repellent. However, the terms are often used interchangeably.

Waterproof

Materials that are impermeable by water.Waterproof- A term applied to fabrics whose pores have been closed, and therefore, will not allow water or air to pass through them.

Weaving

The process of forming a fabric on a loom by interlacing the warp (lengthwise yarns) and the filling (crosswise yarns) perpendicular to each other. Filling is fed into the goods from cones, filling bobbins or quills, which carry the filling yarns through the shed of the loom. Filling may also be inserted into the material without the use of a shuttle, as in the case of a shuttleless loom. The three basic weaves are Plain, Twill, and Satin. All other weaves, no matter how intricate, employ one or more of these basic weaves in their composition. Variations on the basic weaves make a variety of different fabric surfaces and fabric strengths.

Weft

In woven fabric, the filling yarns that run perpendicular to the warp yarns.

Weft Knit

A type of knitted fabric in which yarns are formed into stitches in widthwise manner. Common examples of weft knits are circular knits and flat knits.

Weight of Cloth

This term describes the variety of ways that fabric is sold: Ounces per linear yard, Yards per pound, and Ounces per square yard.

Welded Shell

The outer layer of a bonded wor welded garment, such as a jacket.

Welding

There are two basic methods for applying bonding or welded seams. The first method uses an adhesive film, and the application of heat to glue or laminate two substrates together. The second method involves gluing or attaching two fabrics, using ultrasonic technology. The creation and channeling of high frequency vibratory waves cause a rapid buildup of heat in synthetic fabrics to create the bonding.Welt- 1. A strip of material seamed to a pocket opening as a finishing, as well as a strengthening device. 2. A raised or swelled lap or seam. 3. A covered cord or ornamental strip sewed on a border or along a seam. 4. In knitting, it is flat-knitted separately and then joined to the fabric by looping or hand knitting, as the heel to the stocking. 5. A ribbed piece of knit goods used in forming the end of a sleeve or sock to prevent rolling or raveling.

Welt Lining

Interlining for pocket welts.

Whipcord

A woven fabric with a very steep and compacted twill appearance on the face of the goods. End-uses for the fabric include dress woolens, worsteds, or wool blends, and many types of uniforms.

White Goods

A very broad term which implies any goods bleached and finished in the white condition. Some of the cotton white goods are muslin, cambric, dimity, lawn, longcloth, organdy, voile, etc.White-on-White- Some fabrics, such as men's shirtings or broadcloth, poplin, madras, etc., are made on a dobby or jacquard loom so the white motifs will appear on a white background.

Wickability

The ability of a fiber or a fabric to disperse moisture and allow it to pass through to the surface of the fabric, so that evaporation can take place.

Wicking

Dispersing or spreading of moisture or liquid through a given area by capillary action in a material.

Wigwan

A converted cotton cloth, dyed black, brown or gray, and given a firm starched, plain calender finish, and used for interlinings in men's and boys's clothing to give body to the garment.

Wind Resistant

The ability of a fabric to act against or oppose the penetration of wind or air, but it is not totally windproof.

Windproof

The ability of a fabric to be nonpermeable to wind and air.

Woof

Comes from the Anglo-Saxon "owef". It is another name for the warp or warp yarn. Sometimes in advertising textiles, the word has been used to imply filling yarn, and made to interchange with the other term, weft.

Wool

Usually associated with fiber or fabric made from the fleece of sheep or lamb. However, the term "wool" can also apply to all animal hair fibers, including the hair of the Cashmere or Angora goat or the specialty hair fibers of the camel, alpaca, llama, or vicuna.

Worsted Fabric

A tightly woven fabric made by using only long staple, combed wool or wool-blend yarns. The fabric has a hard, smooth surface. Gabardine is an example of a worsted fabric. A common end use is men's tailored suits.

Worsted System

The textile process of manufacturing spun yarns from staple fibers usually over 3 inches in length. The main operations are carding, combing, drafting, and spinning.

Woven Fabric

Fabrics composed of two sets of yarns. One set of yarns, the warp, runs along the length of the fabric. The other set of yarns, the fill or weft, is perpendicular to the warp. Woven fabrics are held together by weaving the warp and the fill yarns over and under each other.

Wrinkle Free

A resistant to wrinkling created through the use of a variety of finishes and treatments.Wrinkle Recovery- Similar to resiliency. It is the ability of a fabric to bounce back after it has been twisted, wrinkled, or distorted in any way.
 
 

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