Textile Dictionary-V

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Vegetable Fibres 
Fibres derived from annual and perennial plants.

Velour 
A knitted or woven pile fabric

Velvet 
A cut warp-pile fabric in which the cut fibrous ends of yarn form the surface of the fabric.

Velours 
The French word for velvet, but now it is a term for any fabric that resembles velvet.

Velvet 
Velvet is a fabric that has a thick short pile on the surface causing a nap or directional quality. Velvet can be plain, striped or of a pattern and made of cotton, linen, mohair, synthetic fibers or silk. The finer quality may be used for draperies and the heavier goods are used for upholstery.

Voile 
A light transparent fabric of a plain weave.The popularity of home decorating fabrics is subject to the whims of fashion and taste as with all other elements of home furnishings but this textile dictionary can serve as a guide and fabric overview.

Velour
A medium weight, closely woven fabric with a thick pile. It can be made using either a plain weave or a satin weave construction. It resembles velvet, but has a lower cut pile. End uses include apparel, upholstery, and drapes.

Velvet
A medium weight cut-pile constructed fabric in which the cut pile stands up very straight. It is woven using two sets of warp yarns; the extra set creates the pile. Velvet, a luxurious fabric, is commonly made with a filament fiber for high luster and smooth hand.

Velveteen
A cotton cut-pile weave fabric, utilizing extra fill yarn construction, with either a twill or a plain weave back. The fabric is woven with two sets of filling yarns; the extra set creates the pile.

Virgin Wool
New wool that has never been used before, or reclaimed from any spun, woven, knitted, felted, manufactured or used products.

Viscose
The most common type of rayon. It is produced in much greater quantity than cuprammonium rayon, the other commercial type.

Voile
A crisp, lightweight, plain weave cotton-like fabric, made with high twist yarns in a high yarn count construction. Similar in appearance to organdy and organza. Used in blouses dresses and curtains.

Velvet
There are two types of velvets. The hand woven velvet and the automatically woven velvet. The machine made velvet is a double-faced fabric. It weaves two fabrics, face to face, joined by the weft yarns. These yarns are then cut automatically which forms the pile on both faces.

Velveteen
A fabric with a single weft, similar to velvet but generally much softer and used for apparel.

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Mazharul Islam Kiron is a textile consultant and researcher on online business promotion. He is working with one European textile machinery company as a country agent. He is also a contributor of Wikipedia.


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