Textile Dictionary-O

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Ombre
A term used to describe fabrics with a dyed, printed or woven design in which the colour is graduated from light to dark and often into stripes of varying shades.

Open end Spinning
A spinning system in which sliver feedstock is highly drafted and thus creates an open end or break in the fibre flow. The fibres are subsequently assembled on the end of a rotating yarn and twisted in. Techniques for collecting and twisting the fibres into a yarn include rotor spinning and frictionspinning

Organza
A thin but stiff plain woven silk fabric.

Ottoman
A warp-faced fabric showing a bold weft-way rib.

Oxford
A plain-weave shirting of good quality yarns that has two warp ends weaving as one.

Organdy
A thin, transparent and very lightweight fabric of very stiff but fine cotton cloth.

Off-pressing
Pressing done after the garment is completely sewn.

Olefirn (polyolefin/polypropylene)
A manufactured fiber characterized by its light weight, high strength, and abrasion resistance. Olefin is also good at transporting moisture, creating a wicking action. End-uses include activewear apparel, rope, indoor-outdoor carpets, lawn furniture, and upholstery.

Open-shoulder construction
A method used onb better coats that is characterized by hand-sewn lining shoulder seams.

Organdy
A stiffened, sheer, lightweight plain weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count. End-uses include blouses, dresses, and curtains/draperies.

Organza -
A crisp, sheer, lightweight plain weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count, made of silk, rayon, nylon, or polyester. The fabric is used primarily in evening and wedding apparel for women.

Osnaburg
A tough medium to heavyweight coarsely woven plain weave fabric, usually made of a cotton or cotton/poly blend. Lower grades of the unfinished fabric are used for such industrial purposes as bags, sacks, pipe coverings. Higher grades of finished osnaburg can be found in mattress ticking, slipcovers, workwear, and apparel.

Ottoman
A tightly woven plain weave ribbed fabric with a hard slightly lustered surface. The ribbed effect is created by weaving a finer silk or manufactured warp yarn with a heavier filler yarn, usually made of cotton, wool, or waste yarn. In the construction, the heavier filler yarn is completely covered by the warp yarn, thus creating the ribbed effect. End uses for this fabric include coats, suits, dresses, upholstery, and draperies.

Outseam -
The distance from the bottom of the trouser leg to the top of the pant at the waist. The measurement is taken along the outside leg seam that joins the front and back leg panels, and includes the width of the waistband.

Oven
Enclosed heating equipment used by garment manufacturers to apply heat for the purpose of applying heat to a garment to set, or cure (bake), a durable press finish on the article.

Oxford
A fine, soft, lightweight woven cotton or blended with manufactured fibers in a 2 x 1 basket weave variation of the plain weave construction. The fabric is used primarily in shirtings.

Olefin
A manmade fiber composed of at least 85% by weight of ethylene, propylene or other olefin units.

Organza
A thin, transparent silk, rayon or nylon fabric made in a plain weave and given a stiff, wiry finish.

Off-pressing
Pressing done after the garment is completely sewn.

Olefirn (polyolefin/polypropylene)
A manufactured fiber characterized by its light weight, high strength, and abrasion resistance. Olefin is also good at transporting moisture, creating a wicking action. End-uses include activewear apparel, rope, indoor-outdoor carpets, lawn furniture, and upholstery.

Open-shoulder construction
A method used onb better coats that is characterized by hand-sewn lining shoulder seams.

Organdy
A stiffened, sheer, lightweight plain weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count. End-uses include blouses, dresses, and curtains/draperies.

Organza
A crisp, sheer, lightweight plain weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count, made of silk, rayon, nylon, or polyester. The fabric is used primarily in evening and wedding apparel for women.

Osnaburg
A tough medium to heavyweight coarsely woven plain weave fabric, usually made of a cotton or cotton/poly blend. Lower grades of the unfinished fabric are used for such industrial purposes as bags, sacks, pipe coverings. Higher grades of finished osnaburg can be found in mattress ticking, slipcovers, workwear, and apparel.

Ottoman
A tightly woven plain weave ribbed fabric with a hard slightly lustered surface. The ribbed effect is created by weaving a finer silk or manufactured warp yarn with a heavier filler yarn, usually made of cotton, wool, or waste yarn. In the construction, the heavier filler yarn is completely covered by the warp yarn, thus creating the ribbed effect. End uses for this fabric include coats, suits, dresses, upholstery, and draperies.

Outseam
The distance from the bottom of the trouser leg to the top of the pant at the waist. The measurement is taken along the outside leg seam that joins the front and back leg panels, and includes the width of the waistband.

Oven
Enclosed heating equipment used by garment manufacturers to apply heat for the purpose of applying heat to a garment to set, or cure (bake), a durable press finish on the article.

Oxford
A fine, soft, lightweight woven cotton or blended with manufactured fibers in a 2 x 1 basket weave variation of the plain weave construction. The fabric is used primarily in shirtings.

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Editor-in-Chief:

Mazharul Islam Kiron is a textile consultant and researcher on online business promotion. He is working with one European textile machinery company as a country agent. He is also a contributor of Wikipedia.


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