Textile Dictionary-L

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Latent Heat

The quantity of heat absorbed or released by a substance undergoing a change of state, such as ice changing to water or water to steam, at constant temperature and pressure. When a solid material is heated and reaches its melting point, it goes from solid to liquid. During this process the material absorbs a certain amount of heat, Despite the heat input, the temperature of the material stays at a relatively constant level, even though phase change is taking place. We thus speak of latent (concealed) heat having been taken up by the material.

Lawn

A light, fine cloth made using carded or combed, linen or cotton yarns. The fabric has a crease-resistant, crisp finish. Linen lawn is synonymous with handkerchief linen. Cotton lawn is a similar type of fabric, which can be white, solid colored, or printed.

Left-hand twill

Any twill weave which runs from the left. The twill or diagonal line on the face of the fabric will run from the upper left-hand corner to the lower right-hand corner of the fabric.Leight Weight- Having an airy weave. Used as a light weight base layer in apparel for aerobic activities and cool weather.

Leno Weave

A construction of woven fabrics in which the resulting fabric is very sheer, yet durable. In this weave, two or more warp yarns are twisted around each other as they are interlaced with the filling yarns; thus securing a firm hold on the filling yarn and preventing them from slipping out of position. Also called the gauze weave.Leno weave fabrics are frequently used for window treatments, because their structure gives good durability with almost no yarn slippage, and permits the passage of light and air.

Linen

A fabric made from linen fibers obtained from inside the woody stem of the flax plant. Linen fibers are much stronger and more lustrous than cotton. Linen fabrics are very cool and absorbent, but wrinkle very easily, unless blended with manufactured fibers. Linen is one of the oldest tex A fabric that is used to cover the inside of a garment to provide a finished look. Generally, the litile fibers.Lining-ning is made of a smooth lustrous fabric. Loft- High loft is thick and fluffy, low loft is thin and dense. The higher the loft, the better the insulation characteristic.

Loom

A machine used for weaving fabrics.

Loom-Finished

Material sold in the same condition in which the goods came from the loom---duck, webbing, canvas, burlap, etc.

Lyocell Fiber

A manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose. Lyocell has a similar hand and drape as rayon, but is stronger, more durable, and in many cases machine washable. It has a subtle luster and is rich in color. Lyocell possesses low shrinkage characteristics, as well as good absorbency and wrinkle resistant qualities.

Lace

Fine open-work fabric with a mesh ground upon which patterns are worked.

Ladder Yarn

A knitted tape yarn with the appearance of a ladder.

Lap

A sheet of fibres or fabric wrapped around a core

Lay

Lengths of fabric, several plies high, which have been spread on a cutting table ready for cutting. The fabric is subsequently cut in accordance with a cutting plan which is usually designed to optimise materials utilization

Lay Plan

A plan in garment making of the lay height, lay length, colour mix, selection of fabric pieces to be cut, and the batches from which the fabric is to be used.

Layering

Layering involves the use of a comfort or base layer; an insulation layer; and a protection layer. The base layer comprises clothing worn next to the skin. Perspiration drying on the skin can cause chilling. However, this effect can be minimised by wearing a base layer which wicks moisture away from the skin. The insulation layer is the middle layer in the system and enables the wearer to regulate his or her body temperature by putting on or taking off garments as necessary. Insulation layer garments should be lightweight and warm, and should dry quickly in order to retain body heat. They should also let perspiration vapour escape from the comfort layer underneath, and retain their insulating properties even when wet. The protection layer is an outer layer of waterproof and windproof fabric. It should be highly breathable, so as to allow perspiration vapour to escape easily from the comfort layer and the insulation layer.

Laying-up

The process of spreading lengths of fabric on a cutting table to make a lay.

Leaching

The removal of a substance (such as a dyestuff) by a liquid which is in contact with the substance.

Leno Weaving

A form of weaving in which warp threads are made to cross one another between weft insertions.

Linear Density

The weight per unit length of a yarn or fibre. Units of linear density include decitex and denier.

Looper

An eyed stitch-forming element which carries an under thread or a cover thread on some types of sewing machine.

Lyocell

The generic name given to a new family of cellulosic fibres and yarns that have been produced by solvent spinning. The process is widely regarded as being environmentally-friendly, and the product offers a number of advantages over traditional cellulosic fibres.

Lamb's Wool

The first clip of wool sheered from lambs up to eight months old. The wool is soft, slippery and resilient. It is used in fine grade woolen fabrics.

Lame

A woven fabric using flat silver or gold metal threads to create either the design or the background in the fabric.

Laminated Fabric

A term used to describe fabrics which have been joined together through the use of a high-strength reinforcing scrim or base fabrics between two plies of flexible thermoplastic film.. It can a bonded utilizing either foam itself, or some other material, such as adhesives, heat, or chemical bonding agents.. See BONDING.

Lapel

The part of a garment that is turned back in the front. The front fold on a shirt that is a continuation of the collar.

Lapels (padding)

Attaching the lapel to canvas with several rows of blindstitching.

Latent Heat

The quantity of heat absorbed or released by a substance undergoing a change of state, such as ice changing to water or water to steam, at constant temperature and pressure. When a solid material is heated and reaches its melting point, it goes from solid to liquid. During this process the material absorbs a certain amount of heat, Despite the heat input, the temperature of the material stays at a relatively constant level, even though phase change is taking place. We thus speak of latent (concealed) heat having been taken up by the material.

Lawn

A light, fine cloth made using carded or combed, linen or cotton yarns. The fabric has a crease-resistant, crisp finish. Linen lawn is synonymous with handkerchief linen. Cotton lawn is a similar type of fabric, which can be white, solid colored, or printed.

Left-hand twill

Any twill weave which runs from the left. The twill or diagonal line on the face of the fabric will run from the upper left-hand corner to the lower right-hand corner of the fabric.

Leight Weight

Having an airy weave. Used as a light weight base layer in apparel for aerobic activities and cool weather.

Leno Weave

A construction of woven fabrics in which the resulting fabric is very sheer, yet durable. In this weave, two or more warp yarns are twisted around each other as they are interlaced with the filling yarns; thus securing a firm hold on the filling yarn and preventing them from slipping out of position. Also called the gauze weave. Leno weave fabrics are frequently used for window treatments, because their structure gives good durability with almost no yarn slippage, and permits the passage of light and air.

Linen

A fabric made from linen fibers obtained from inside the woody stem of the flax plant. Linen fibers are much stronger and more lustrous than cotton. Linen fabrics are very cool and absorbent, but wrinkle very easily, unless blended with manufactured fibers. Linen is one of the oldest textile fibers.

Lining

A fabric that is used to cover the inside of a garment to provide a finished look. Generally, the lining is made of a smooth lustrous fabric.

Loft

High loft is thick and fluffy, low loft is thin and dense. The higher the loft, the better the insulation characteristic.

Loom

A machine used for weaving fabrics.

Loom-Finished

Material sold in the same condition in which the goods came from the loom---duck, webbing, canvas, burlap, etc.

Lyocell Fiber

A manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose. Lyocell has a similar hand and drape as rayon, but is stronger, more durable, and in many cases machine washable. It has a subtle luster and is rich in color. Lyocell possesses low shrinkage characteristics, as well as good absorbency and wrinkle resistant qualities.

Lace

An openwork fabric produced by a network of threads, twisted together and sometimes knotted, to form patterns. It is made by hand, with needles, with hooks or by machinery.

Linen Strong,

lustrous yarn made from flax fiber.

Lis'er'e

The design is created by coloured warp threads brought up on the face of the fabric, leaving loose yarns on the back woven vertically, which gives it a vertical stripe effect. Lis'er'es are Victorian in appearance and have embroidered style patterns.

Loom state

Goods as they come off the loom before converting or finishing. Also called gray or griege.

Loop & Brush Fringe

A combination of a loop and cut brush fringe style within the same trimming.

Loop Fringe

Similar to a brush fringe except that the yarns at the base of the skirt are looped, not cut. The bottom edge of a loop fringe can be straight or scalloped.

Lame'

A woven fabric using flat silver or gold metal threads to create either the design or the background in the fabric.

Laminated Fabric

A term used to describe fabrics which have been joined together through the use of a high-strength reinforcing scrim or base fabrics between two plies of flexible thermoplastic film.. It can a bonded utilizing either foam itself, or some other material, such as adhesives, heat, or chemical bonding agents.

Lapel

The part of a garment that is turned back in the front. The front fold on a shirt that is a continuation of the collar.

Lapels (padding)

Attaching the lapel to canvas with several rows of blindstitching.

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