Textile Dictionary-F

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

False Twist
The twist inserted in yarn using false twisting such that the net twist in the yarn is zero.

Fancy Yarn
A yarn which differs from the normal construction of single and folded yarns by way of deliberately produced irregularities in its construction. These irregularities are formed by increasing the input of one or more of the yarns components.

Fell (of the cloth)
The edge of the fabric in a weaving loom formed by the last weft thread.

Felting
The matting together of fibres during processing. This is achieved on animal hair or wool by the application of moisture or heat, which causes the constituent fibres to mat together.

Fibre
A material used to make textiles which is flexible, fine, and has a high ratio of length to thickness.

Fibrefill
Staple fibres used for stuffing or padding quilts, upholstery and toys, etc.

Fibroin
A tough, elastic protein which forms the principal component of raw silk.

Fil Coupé
Extra, floating, wefts which are embodied in a fabric, particularly a jacquard, and can be cut to produce a fringe effect.

Filament
A fibre of indefinite length. Flame resistant: a term used to describe fibres, yarns or fabrics which resist burning.

Flame Retardant
A substance added or a treatment applied to a material in order to suppress, significantly reduce or delay the propagation of flame.

Flannel
Generally, a cotton or wool fabric, which has been napped on one or both sides (usually both) followed by a bleaching, dyeing or printing process and then brushed or rerun through the napping machine to revive the nap.

Flared Leg
A style of jeans which are tightly fitted around the hips and thighs of a person but become much wider from the knees downwards.

Flax
The fibre used to make linen textiles.

Fleece fabric
A fabric, usually knitted, with a heavy napped surface on one side. The fabric is produced using two types of yarn, one for the face area and the other for the reverse.

Floating (Warp)
A length of warp yarn which passes over two or more weft threads (rather than intersecting with them) in a woven structure.

Floating (Weft)
A length of weft yarn which passes over two or more warp threads (rather than intersecting with them) in a woven structure.

Flock
A material obtained by reducing textile fibres to fragments by, for example, cutting, tearing, or grinding.

Flock Printing
A process in which a fabric is printed with an adhesive, followed by the application of finely chopped fibres over the whole surface of the fabric by means of dusting-on, an air blast, or electrostatic attraction. The fibres adhere to the printed areas, and are removed from the unprinted areas by mechanical action.

Flocking
A process in which short chopped lengths of fibre (flock) are applied to an adhesive coated backing fabric or other substrate. The application is usually carried out electrostatically.

Foam Printing
A process in which a rubber solution is turned into a foam and squeezed through a screen to make a rubber print. Also known as puff rubber printing.

FOB
Free-on-board goods are delivered on-board a ship or to another carrier at no cost to the buyer.
 
Folded Yarn
A yarn made by twisting two or more single yarns together in one operation.

Free Shrinkage
Spontaneous shrinkage in the absence of outside influences such as heat or a liquid.

Free Swell Absorbency
The weight of fluid in grams that can be absorbed by 1 gram of fibre, yarn or fabric.

Fretting
the wearing away of filaments through friction. Fuji silk: a spun-silk fabric woven in a plain weave.

Flounce
Hanging strips of material which are normally sewn to the hem of a skirt.

Fringe
An example of trim or embellishment that is used on draperies, upholstery and other soft home decorating goods.

Frieze
A pile fabric with uncut loops with the patterns created by cutting some of the loops or using different color yarns.

Face Finished Fabrics
Fabrics which have surface treatments that provide a variety of looks and effects on the fabric surface. These include brushing, sanding, sueding, etc. The warp knit industry is specially innovative with face finishing techniques

Facing
A piece of fabric that is sewn to the collar, front opening, cuffs, or arms eye of a garment to create a finished look.

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Editor-in-Chief:

Mazharul Islam Kiron is a textile consultant and researcher on online business promotion. He is working with one European textile machinery company as a country agent. He is also a contributor of Wikipedia.


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